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Hispanic Artists Who Are Famous All Over the World – Guide to Hispanic Art Culture

30.08.2021
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Spain’s contribution to the history of Western painting cannot be overlooked. Here is one of the greatest museums in the world – the Prado. During the Spanish Golden Age, the country flourished in art and literature, becoming a major contributor to the European art world. Spain produced some of the most respected artists during this era, who have had a significant impact on contemporary art. From the very beginning of art, Hispanic artists have created some gorgeous, thrilling, and even erotic images. Below are some of the most famous artists who have lived and worked in Spain.

Spanish artists have created many unique masterpieces of world art and will forever remain in the memory of grateful descendants. The works of the 10 most famous of them are studied in detail by specialists, and the paintings of the great Spanish masters are still admired by visitors to the best museums in the world.

Spain boasts great Spanish painters of genius. But if they were not there, no one would be surprised.

After all, this country has almost always been conservative. And where there is excessive moral inertia, and even more so the Inquisition, their innovators do not survive or simply are not born.

List of Famous Hispanic Artists

The most famous Hispanic American artists belong to different historical eras, styles, and genres. Most of them achieved recognition during their lifetime, not only in their homeland, but also far beyond its borders.

Joan Miro

Joan Miro

Joan Miro was an influential Spanish artist, ceramist, and sculptor. He was born in 1893 in Barcelona, ​​Spain. He spent most of his time in Italy, but most of his work was based on images from his native Barcelona. His works were inspired by the human psyche and were created in a surreal manner.

Miro was one of the first Spanish watercolor artists to develop automatic drawings as a rebellion against tradition, which he understood to support bourgeois society. He introduced the beginnings of surrealism as an artistic movement. Miro is also considered to be the ancestor of the Abstract Expressionist movement.

Some of his famous works include The Farm, Blue II, and the Carnival of Harlequin. In addition to painting, he also worked as a lithographer, creating many sculptures and murals for public spaces.

Francisco De Zurbaran

Francisco De Zurbaran

In the work of this artist, paintings with images of Christian saints, martyrs, and prominent figures of the Catholic Church occupy a special place. In addition, Zurbaran was an outstanding master of still life, and for the skillful use of chiaroscuro in his works, he was nicknamed “Spanish Caravaggio” during his lifetime.

The bold writing style of 19th-century Spanish painters at the beginning of his creative career brought him wide fame, but later alienated many customers and patrons. The painter, once the court painter of King Philip IV, died in poverty, experiencing serious financial difficulties.

El Greco

El Greco

El Greco was born in 1541 on an island in present-day Greece. Its official name was Domenicos Theotokopoulo but was named “El Greco” because of its Greek origin. He began his career in Italy and moved to Spain in 1577, where he created most of his work. El Greco was a master of religious disciplines, but no less rich in portrait and landscape painting. He rejected naturalism for more conceptual representations.

Greco’s work influenced several movements, such as Cubism and Expressionism. In fact, historians have struggled to put him in any conventional school. Some of his famous arts include Christ Carrying the Cross and The Burial of the Count of Orgas which are considered by many artists to be an amalgamation of all the prominent attributes of Greco’s art.

Diego Velazquez

Diego Velazquez

Diego Velazquez was born in 1599 in Seville. He is described as a painter of painters and is best known for some of his stunning portraits. Diego was a member of the royal court of King Philip IV, where he painted portraits of courtiers and other nobles, drawing his admiration throughout the country. But his painting was not limited to nobles and members of the royal courts; he also painted portraits of other people with low social ratings.

Velazquez also created paintings that depicted historical and cultural events. One of his famous paintings by Hispanic artwork Las Meninas, a portrait of the king’s young daughters and himself in the act of painting. He died in 1660 in Madrid. Most of his paintings can be found in the Prado, Madrid, and other museums in New York, São Paulo, and London.

Bartolome Esteban Murillo

Bartolome Esteban Murillo

The greatest representative of the Seville school of painting and Hispanic art mainly painted pictures on religious themes, although his legacy includes charming landscapes and works of everyday life. As a deeply religious person, Murillo, unlike most of his colleagues, led an ascetic lifestyle and had great authority in his native country. A special place in his work is occupied by the image of the Virgin Mary, to whom dozens of wonderful works are dedicated.

Pablo Picasso

Pablo Picasso

Pablo Picasso is probably one of the greatest Hispanic culture art that ever lived. He was born in 1881 in Malaga and spent most of his time in France. Picasso is one of the founders of the Cubist movement. However, most of his early work was based on realism. Cubism is credited with revolutionizing European painting and sculpture.

Picasso’s painting style changed over time as he experimented with different techniques, theories and ideas. During his career, he created over 1900 paintings. Some of his paintings are some of the most expensive works of Hispanic art history ever sold. Some of his famous paintings include Guernica, The Weeping Woman, as well as Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. Picasso’s early works can be seen in Barcelona’s Picasso Museum and Madrid’s Reina Sofia Museum.

Antony Tapies

Antony Tapies

The avant-garde artist Tapies was a self-taught artist and did not recognize authorities in art. He developed his own style of creativity, in which the motives of abstractionism and symbolism were mixed. Despite the originality of his views, the audience and critics often accepted Tapies’ ideas with enthusiasm, his solo exhibitions were a great success, and by the end of his life, the artist won a huge number of awards and prizes for Hispanic art culture.

To create sculptures and paintings, the master often used highly unconventional materials, including straw, cloth, and sand. He also gained fame as an outstanding art theorist, and his books in this field have been translated into dozens of foreign languages.

Hispanic Female Artists

Maria Izquerdo

Maria Izquerdo

The first name that comes to our mind when we hear the phrase “Mexican artists” is of course Frida Kahlo. But despite Frida’s overwhelming popularity all over the world, the first Mexican woman whose work was exhibited and highly appreciated abroad was her contemporary Maria Izquerdo.

Maria Kenobia Iscuerdo Gutierrez, according to some sources, was born in 1902, according to others – in 1906 in the Mexican state of Jalisco. At the age of five, she lost her father, and custody of the girl was taken over by her grandmother, with whom Maria moved a lot from place to place. The girl managed to live in the towns of Aguascalientes, Torreone, Saltillo. Once at the Saltillo school, at the age of thirteen, Maria began to study painting. However, a year later, following the will of a strict grandmother, she married Colonel Candido Posadas.

Sometimes her painting is brought closer to surrealism, while noting her attraction to folk art. Researchers call Isquardo’s style “naive”, referring to the primitivism of Henri Matisse. Also noted is her “virtuoso use of color” with the “provincial simplicity” of the plot.

Let’s be honest, the glory of Frida Kahlo still overshadowed the glory of Iskuerdo. But this does not mean that the latter is forgotten – Mexico is still proud of its artist.

Unfortunately, now most of Isquardo’s works are outside Mexico in private collections, some of them have been lost. Therefore, in October 2002, during the events dedicated to the centenary of Isquardo’s birth, the artist’s paintings were declared a National Cultural Heritage by Mexican oil painting artists.

Lita Cabellut

Lita Cabellut

Lita Cabellut is a gypsy who tells endless stories about people with a brush on canvas. “I am more than an artist. I am a storyteller, she says about herself. And this woman is not only one of the most famous Hispanic surrealist artists, but she is also one of the most sought-after and highly paid artists of the 21st century in general. Cabellut is one of the “Top 500” artists of our time, and collectors around the world are fighting for her paintings.

It is surprising that with all this, few people are familiar with her work in Spain itself. This is exactly the case when the world fame of the artist surpasses his fame at home. True, in fairness, it should be noted that Lita left Spain more than forty years ago.

So you have learned all the necessary information about Hispanic visual artists, as well as read a little about famous Hispanic artist’s paintings, thanks to our article, which we prepared for you with the team.

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